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April 4, 2022
7:00-9:00PM

Jim McCormac - Photographing Moths

Zoom opens at 6:30 presentation begins at 7:00

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https://us02web.zoom.us/j/82180060634
Meeting ID: 821 8006 0634

Butterfly photos abound. The beautiful insects are diurnal, and relatively easy to shoot. Virtually everyone that photographs nature has trained their lens on a butterfly at some point. The darker side of the Order Lepidoptera, the moths, are nearly ignored in comparison. Yet moth species outnumber butterflies by many fold. In Ohio, about 140 butterfly species have been found, counting rarities. The number of moth species could number as many as 4,000, or more. One could argue, and I would be one, that moths are infinitely more interesting than butterflies. There is no disputing that the subject material is far greater, and far less photographed. This talk will discuss the magical world of moths, how to find/attract them, shooting techniques, and the big picture: why moths are vital to conservation.

Bio
Jim worked for the Ohio Department of Natural Resources for 31 years as a botanist, and later specializing in wildlife diversity projects, especially involving birds. He has authored or coauthored six books, including Birds of Ohio (Lone Pine 2004); and Wild Ohio: The Best of Our Natural Heritage (Kent State University Press 2009). The latter won the 2010 Ohioana Book award. He is a coauthor of the Ohio Breeding Bird Atlas II book. He’s currently at work on books about dragonflies. His book Gardening for Moths, coauthored with Chelsea Gottfried, is in press (Ohio University Press) and will appear in summer/fall 2022. Jim writes a column, Nature, for the Columbus Dispatch, and regularly publishes a natural history blog. He has written numerous articles in a variety of publications, and has delivered hundreds of presentations throughout the eastern United States. He was named 2015 Conservation Communicator of the Year by the Ohio League of Sportsmen. Jim is an avid photographer, shooting a range of natural history subjects. He has had hundreds of photos published in various forums. His photography can be sampled at https://www.jimmccormac.com/

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Add to Calendar aCLuDhaqizCaPxAftmqF167204 04/04/2022 07:00 PM 04/04/2022 09:00 PM false America/Detroit Jim McCormac - Photographing Moths Join Zoom Meetinghttps://us02web.zoom.us/j/82180060634Meeting ID: 821 8006 0634 Butterfly photos abound. The beautiful insects are diurnal, and relatively easy to shoot. Virtually everyone that photographs nature has trained their lens on a butterfly at some point. The darker side of the Order Lepidoptera, the moths, are nearly ignored in comparison. Yet moth species outnumber butterflies by many fold. In Ohio, about 140 butterfly species have been found, counting rarities. The number of moth species could number as many as 4,000, or more. One could argue, and I would be one, that moths are infinitely more interesting than butterflies. There is no disputing that the subject material is far greater, and far less photographed. This talk will discuss the magical world of moths, how to find/attract them, shooting techniques, and the big picture: why moths are vital to conservation.BioJim worked for the Ohio Department of Natural Resources for 31 years as a botanist, and later specializing in wildlife diversity projects, especially involving birds. He has authored or coauthored six books, including Birds of Ohio (Lone Pine 2004); and Wild Ohio: The Best of Our Natural Heritage (Kent State University Press 2009). The latter won the 2010 Ohioana Book award. He is a coauthor of the Ohio Breeding Bird Atlas II book. He’s currently at work on books about dragonflies. His book Gardening for Moths, coauthored with Chelsea Gottfried, is in press (Ohio University Press) and will appear in summer/fall 2022. Jim writes a column, Nature, for the Columbus Dispatch, and regularly publishes a natural history blog. He has written numerous articles in a variety of publications, and has delivered hundreds of presentations throughout the eastern United States. He was named 2015 Conservation Communicator of the Year by the Ohio League of Sportsmen. Jim is an avid photographer, shooting a range of natural history subjects. He has had hundreds of photos published in various forums. His photography can be sampled at https://www.jimmccormac.com/ ----